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What is Spinal Stenosis?

Spinal-Stenosis
What is spinal stenosis? A clue to answering this question is found in the meaning of each word. Spinal refers to the spine. Stenosis is a medical term used to describe a condition where a normal-size opening has become narrow.Spinal stenosis may affect the cervical (neck), thoracic (chest), or lumbar (lower back) spines. The most commonly area affected is the lumbar spine followed by the cervical spine. What Does Spinal Stenosis Look Like?To help you to visualize what happens in spinal stenosis, we will consider a water pipe. Over time, rust and debris builds up on the walls of the pipe, thereby narrowing the passageway that normally allows water to freely flow.In the spine, the passageways are the spinal canal and the neuroforamen. The spinal canal is a hollow vertical hole that contains the spinal cord. The neuroforamen are the passageways that are naturally created between the vertebrae through which spinal nerve...
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What is Scoliosis?

What is Scoliosis?
We all have curves in our spines, but scoliosis causes the spine to curve in the wrong direction. It causes sideways curves, and those are different from the spine's normal curves.If you were to look at your spine from the side, you'd see that it curves out at your neck (cervical spine), in at your mid-back (thoracic spine), and out again at your low back (lumbar spine). Your back is supposed to have those curves.However, if you look at your spine from behind, you shouldn't see any curves at all. When there are sideways curves in the spine from this view, that's scoliosis. The curves can look like an "S" or a "C." (You can learn more about spinal anatomy related to scoliosis in the anatomy section below.)Scoliosis is generally associated with children (you may hear it calleed adolescent idiopathic scoliosis), but adults can have it, too. This typically happens when...
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What is Osteoporosis?

What is Osteoporosis?
Osteoporosis: Risk Factors, Vertebral Compression Fractures, and PreventionAbout 52 million Americans1 have osteoporosis and low bone mass. Osteoporosis, which means porous bone, is a serious disease that causes you to lose too much bone, make too little bone, or both. As your bones lose density, they become weaker and more likely to break.If you are 50 and older and have broken a bone, you should talk to your doctor who will most likely recommend a bone density test.Although osteoporosis affects both women and men, studies suggest that approximately one in two women — as compared to up to one in four men age 50 and older — will break a bone due to osteoporosis. Twenty percent of senior citizens who break a hip will die within one year from problems related to the broken bone itself or surgery to repair it. Many of those who survive need long-term nursing home care.Risk Factors for OsteoporosisThere...
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What is Cervical Pain?

What is Cervical Pain?
What is cervical pain? Simply put, it's a pain in your neck.The cervical part of the spine is your neck and is a marvelous and complex structure. It is capable of supporting a head weighing 15 or more pounds while moving in several directions. No other region of the spine has such freedom of movement. This combination however, complexity and mobility, make the neck susceptible to pain and injury. Quick Cervical Spine Anatomy LessonThis complex structure includes 7 small vertebrae, intervertebral discs to absorb shock, joints, the spinal cord, 8 nerve roots, vascular elements, 32 muscles, and ligaments.The nerve roots stem from the spinal cord like tree branches through foramen in the vertebrae. Each nerve root transmits signals (nerve impulses) to and from the brain, shoulders, arms, and chest. A vascular system of 4 arteries and veins run through the neck to circulate blood between the brain and the heart. Joints, muscles,...
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Lower Back Pain

lower back pain
Lower back pain can vary from dull pain that develops gradually to sudden, sharp or persistent pain felt below the waist. Unfortunately, almost everyone, at some point during life will experience lower back pain. The most common cause is muscle strain often related to heavy physical labor, lifting or forceful movement, bending or twisting into awkward positions, or standing in one position too long.Other Causes of Lower Back Pain There are many different conditions that cause or contribute to lower back pain. Many involve nerve compression (eg, pinched nerve) that may generate pain and other symptoms. Types of spinal disorders include trauma-related and degenerative; meaning age-related. Some of these spinal problems are listed below.Bulging or herniated disc. A disc may bulge outward. A herniated disc occurs when the soft interior matter escapes through a crack or ruptures through the disc's protective outer layer. Both disc problems can cause nerve compression, inflammation,...
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Can Chiropractic Help With Asthma?

Can Chiropractic Help With Asthma?
According to research, the skyrocketing number of asthma cases has to do with environmental variables such as increased pollution, food preservatives, mold and even genetics to name a few. While seeing a young child with an inhaler was quite a strange site in the 1980′s, today it is not that uncommon to see several kids in a classroom take out their inhalers for much needed relief.Asthma has become a huge problem and everyone agrees that future generations can expect to see even higher numbers of sufferers. Unfortunately there is no cure for asthma but there are ways to control the symptoms and stop it from becoming a larger problem that it already is.Experts agree that staying out of pollution, eating right, and living in a clean environment all help with the onset of symptoms, but what you may not have known is that chiropractic care has also been shown to reduce...
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